"This year I will sleep more and cry more.
I will learn how to listen to my body,
How to feed her when she’s hungry
And not when she is bored, or lonely.
This year is about putting away apologies—
Shaking the old dust out of my bones,
Getting rid of people and places
That have stopped feeling like home.
.
This year is about the deep kind of soul searching
Reserved for brooding men in classic literature.
This year is for falling in love with all the ways
I am able to feel.
My world is vibrant and alive
And to numb myself would be to waste this body
To waste this breath.
.
Somewhere, billions of years ago,
A star died to put the marrow in my bones
And I ought to make good use of that.
.
I am the result of ten million factors all
Working against me ever coming into existence
And I am here anyway.
.
How could I forget that the same skin
That houses all my anxieties also holds
The same kind of rain that fills oceans?
I have a small lightning storm brewing
In the barrel of my ribs,
How could I forget that?
.
This year, I will be kind to my body,
Because she has always been kind to me.
Because she has entire orchestras beneath her fingernails,
And after so many years,
She deserves a good audience.
.
I am too young to feel so old.
This is the year I change that."

This Year, by Ashe Vernon (via latenightcornerstore)

(via anditslove)

"In the United States, access to tampons and pads for low-income women is a real problem, too: food stamps don’t cover feminine hygiene products, so some women resort to selling their food stamps in order to pay for “luxuries” like tampons. Women in prison often don’t have access to sanitary products at all, and the high cost of a product that half the population needs multiple times a day, every month for approximately 30 years, is simply, well, bullshit."

- The case for free tampons (via stuffmomnevertoldyou)

You know, I don’t think I’ve ever heard anybody suggest that toilet paper or paper towels in public bathrooms shouldn’t be free.  We’d consider it outrageous if that very basic necessity were to be missing, or provided only for purchase.

And yet.

(via animatedamerican)

(via nolongersunday)

"What happens when men enter women’s feminist spaces? Dale Spender did an experiment to find out, and published the results in Man Made Language:at the discussion, which was a workshop on sexism and education in London, were thirty-two women and five men. Apart from the fact that the tape revealed that the men talked for over 50 per cent of the time, it also revealed that what the men wanted to talk about – and the way in which they wanted to talk – was given precedence."

No More ‘what about teh menz’ (via feministartdegree)

(Source: sisterresister, via nolongersunday)

"and i said to my body. softly. ‘i want to be your friend.’ it took a long breath. and replied, ‘i have been waiting my whole life for this.’"

— nayyirah waheed  (via flawlessqueer)

(Source: nayyirahwaheed, via bythelighthouse)

  • me: *owns 264 unread books*
  • me: *buys 17 new books*
  • me: *rereads harry potter*
"Hate. It’s all hate. Because if you can look at the history of women being beaten and battered into silence and second-class citizenship, and still ask if they are at all to blame for the violence visited upon them, there’s nothing else to call that.

There is a tendency to judge the actions of those with the least amount of power the same as those with more power and then ask, “Isn’t that what equality means?” It’s a clever rhetorical evasion of the issue. Equality is the goal, but to pretend that we actually exist as equals right now is to ignore reality. Like it or not, we all carry history with us in our personal interactions. The history of violence against women is one where women’s bodies are a battleground in a struggle for power. Punches, kicks, weapons, and the threat of death have been used to assert dominance and deny women autonomy, at home and out in the rest of the world.

That’s why it’s not a matter of it being wrong for a man to hit a woman because he may be physically stronger than her. It’s not about women being delicate. That line of thinking is standing on the right side of the issue for the wrong reasons. It reinforces patriarchal thinking about a man’s duty being protection.

No, violence against women is a scourge because it establishes a hierarchy of power. It is a means of ensuring submission. It assures the persistence of inequality through terror."

— Mychal Denzel Smith, How to know that you hate women (via sparkamovement)

(via trees-oh-trees)

"What we are doing to the forests of the world is but a mirror reflection of what we are doing to ourselves and to one another."

— Mahatma Gandhi (via purplebuddhaproject)

(via definitive)

"

What men mean when they talk about their “crazy” ex-girlfriend is often that she was someone who cried a lot, or texted too often, or had an eating disorder, or wanted too much/too little sex, or generally felt anything beyond the realm of emotionally undemanding agreement. That does not make these women crazy. That makes those women human beings, who have flaws, and emotional weak spots. However, deciding that any behavior that he does not like must be insane– well, that does make a man a jerk.

And when men do this on a regular basis, remember that, if you are a woman, you are not the exception. You are not so cool and fabulous and levelheaded that they will totally get where you are coming from when you show emotions other than “pleasant agreement.”

When men say “most women are crazy, but not you, you’re so cool” the subtext is not, “I love you, be the mother to my children.” The subtext is “do not step out of line, here.” If you get close enough to the men who say things like this, eventually, you will do something that they do not find pleasant. They will decide you are crazy, because this is something they have already decided about women in general.

"

Lady, You Really Aren’t “Crazy” (via dazedandconfucius)

(Source: sparkamovement, via soleil-vert)

"99.9% of the violence is being perpetrated by men and somehow, men have had the luxury of being able to say, ‘It’s a women’s issue.’ And that’s a deeply mysterious thing, why that is." (x)

(Source: mulders, via gillyandersons)

"I have two daughters, so I’m raising two future women. Maybe! I mean, one of them might be a guy later. It’s possible. It could happen. Someday one of my daughters could be like ‘Dad, I’m really a guy’ and I’ll be like ‘Alright well let’s get you a dick, honey. We’ll get you the nicest dick in town.’"

Louis CK (reason #94826 why he’s the best comedian)

Somewhere along the way, Louis CK become society’s ideal father and I’m 100% okay with this.

(via mildlyamused)

(Source: redlipstickineverybloodtype, via hallowahmos)

shamelustly:

tinalikesbutts:

Fucking kids care more about each other than we do

I was gone from school for two weeks after being in an accident and when i came back to school literally no one gave a fuck. I wish we can all go back to our 4 year old selves because growing up teaches us how to hate and be self centered. 

(Source: sizvideos, via forgave)

(Source: mulders, via trees-oh-trees)

"Gaming culture was never anything but this weird, insular, xenophobic ghetto built around very toxic notions of masculinity and persecution complex. Games marketed at boys promoted and reinforced this hyper-machismo image, and gamers were seeking to embody it and so it went in an endless self-reinforcing circle. It is no accident that teenagers scream homophobic and gender slurs into their head-sets or brag about “raping” the opposing team in Call of Duty. It’s no accident that video game related message boards basically invented the “tits or gtfo” greeting. It is no accident that Anita Sarkesian could post feminist critiques of SF films, TV shows and novels without much harassment but the moment she started talking about video games, she instantly got death and rape threats. Because this community was not build around tolerance, acceptance of criticism or diversity. It was a fortress of solitude built by man-children to protect their toys from evil mainstream activists."

Let’s have a serious talk about Gamer culture  (via gonzomessiah)

@mama-nana

(via divinefestival)

(Source: azspot, via trees-oh-trees)